PFL & CEE Resource Correlation

Standard 1: The student will describe the importance of earning an income and explain how to manage personal income through the use of a budget.

Resource: It Just Adds Up

Lesson 1 – Money: How Much Will It Buy?

Lesson 2 – Plotting Your Goals

Lesson 3 – Budgeting: Planning for the Future

Lesson 4 – Adjusting Your Actions

Lesson 5 – Building Human Capital

Lesson 6 – Earning an Income

Lesson 7 – Entrepreneurship

Lesson 21 – Budgeting: Planning for Special Purchases

Lesson 22 – Money: How Much Will It Buy?

Resource: Capstone: Exemplary Lessons for High School Economics

Unit 3:

Lesson 15 – Why Do Some People Earn More Than Others? (Lesson description)

Lesson 17 – Creating and Using a Budget (Lesson description)

Lesson 19 – Earning an Income (Lesson description)

Resource: Choices and Changes in Life, School, and Work (Grades 7-8)

Show your middle school students the power of education… why they should stay in school. This life skills program includes lesson plans and a writing journal for students. For 7th and 8th grades.

Lesson 2 – Human Capital and Productivity

Lesson 4 – I Am Part of the Economy

Lesson 8 – My Human Capital

Lesson 12 – Long-Term Consequences:

Lesson 13 – A Job Application

Resource: Entrepreneurship and the US Economy:

Lesson 1 – What is an Entrepreneur?
In this lesson, students will define entrepreneurship; describe entrepreneurial attributes demonstrated by successful entrepreneurs; and, compare personal attributes with attributes generally common to successful entrepreneurs.

Lesson 26 – Human Resource Management: The Entrepreneur’s Perspective
In this lesson, students will describe costs associated with employee absenteeism, apathy, and turnover; identify alternatives available to entrepreneurs for solving specific human resource management problems; evaluate the alternatives available to entrepreneurs for taking advantage of specific human resource opportunities or resolving specific human resource problems

Lesson 35 – You and Entrepreneurial Skills
In this lesson, students will identify at least three major costs and three major benefits of becoming an entrepreneur; explain why different people may view the costs and benefits of becoming and entrepreneur differently; identify and give examples of personal attributes that are important for entrepreneurs; identify internal and external factors that influence a person’s decision to become an entrepreneur; assess their own readiness for becoming an entrepreneur.

Resource: Financial Fitness for Life, Going for the Gold (9-12)

Teacher Guide (Student Guide has activities for each of these lessons)
The senior high student is ready to make a greater commitment to the wider world, but needs a good grasp of the skills necessary to navigate it successfully. Learning to evaluate career choices, spend money, use credit wisely and plan post high school education options are high-interest activities for high school students. Bringing Home the Gold appeals to the growing sense of autonomy older teenagers feel as they begin to take responsibility for their own lives.

Theme 1: There Is No Such Thing as a Free Lunch

Lesson 1 – How to Really Be a Millionaire

Lesson 2 – The Economic Way of Thinking

Lesson 3 – Decision Making

Theme 2: Education Pays Off: Learn Something (Earning Income)

Lesson 4 – Job Application Process

Lesson 5 – Making Your Own Job

Lesson 6 – Why Some Jobs Pay More Than Others

Theme 5: Get a Plan: Get a Grip on Life

Lesson 20 – Managing Your Money

Resource: Financial Fitness for Life, Shaping Up Your Financial Future, (6-8)

Teacher Guide (Student Guide has activities for each of these lessons)
Steps to Financial Fitness contains 15 activity-based lessons for students in grades 3-5. Students make important financial decisions about earning an income, saving and spending, using credit and budgeting.

Theme 1: There Is No Such Thing as a Free Lunch

Lesson 1 – The Economic Way of Thinking

Lesson 2 – Consumer Decision Making

Theme 2: Education Pays Off: Learn Something

Lesson 3 – Career Choice

Lesson 4 – Productivity

Lesson 5 – Why Stay in School?

Theme 5 – Money Management

Lesson15 – Managing Cash

Resource: Focus: High School Economics

Lesson 9 – Learn More, Earn More –
Human capital refers to the knowledge, skills, and experience that people bring to the workplace. With education and training, people increase their human capital and improve their productivity, which usually allows them to increase their income.

Resource: Learning, Earning, and Investing

Learning, Earning and Investing is a multi-faceted, comprehensive investor education program for students in grades four through 12. The 16-lesson middle school print book and the 23-lesson high school print book is designed to teach the benefits of and strategies for long-term investing success. In addition, the companion Web site offers a wide array of current data, investment education links, downloadable classroom visuals, interactive lessons and classroom-tested print lessons for students.

Lesson 3 – Invest in Yourself

Lesson 4 – Why Do People Go to School?

Resource: Mathematics and Economics

Created to help mathematics teachers answer the proverbial question “Why do I have to learn this?” Mathematics & Economics: Connections for Life is a set of lecture material, classroom activities, and Web resources designed to help students discover how mathematical processes and concepts can be used in real world situations. The materials include one book for grades 3-5, one book for grades 6-8 and one book for grades 9-12.

Lesson 8 – Could You Earn a Million Dollars?

Lesson 12 – Charting a Budget

Resource: Master Curriculum Guide: Economics and Entrepreneurship

Lesson 2 – Can I Be an Entrepreneur?
Entrepreneurs tend to exemplify some unique “packages” of characteristics that tend to distinguish them from other people in the economy. Their principal motivation is the need for achievement coupled with a strong desire for independence.

Lesson 3 – What Does the Entrepreneur Need to Know?
Besides having certain personality and physiological characteristics, such as independence and a high energy level, the successful entrepreneur must generally also have some knowledge of business practices and procedures before starting a business. This has become more important as our business and economic world has become increasingly more complex.

Lesson 12 – Profits and Entrepreneurship
People become entrepreneurs for many reasons, including the desire to earn a profit. A commonly used measure of profit is the difference between a firm’s revenue and its costs. Such as simple definition can be misleading if it excludes considerations of alternative uses for the entrepreneur’s time or money.

Resource: Personal Decision Making

Lesson 2 – Applying a Decision-Making Model: Y0u and Your Future
Students participate in a group activity using the decision-making grid. They learn why two individuals may reach different decisions even when they use an identical decision-making model. This lesson helps students appreciate different points of view.

Lesson 3 – Planning and Goal Setting: Can You Get There from Here?
This lesson is in two parts. Part I focuses on how to set goals. Part II focuses on the influence goal setting has on exploring careers. Each part of the lesson can stand alone or can be used with Lesson 4, A Student’s Potential for the Labor Market or Lesson 6, Financial Planning: Budgeting Your Financial Resources.

Lesson 4 – A Student’s Potential in the Labor Market: It’s a Matter of Supply and Demand
Students engage in two labor market simulations. One market is characterized by high wages and specific skill requirements; the other is characterized by low wages and low skill requirements. Students evaluate their own skills and plan ways to improve the skills in which they are weak.

Lesson 6 – Financial Planning: Budgeting Your Financial Resources
Students participate in a motivational activity in which they evaluate the costs and benefits of impulse buying and its effect on living on a limited income. After they analyze a sample budget, students develop their own budget that might be appropriate upon leaving school.

Resource: The Great Economic Mysteries Book – Grade 4-8

Chapter 3

Lesson14 – Why Don’t All Students Study Hard at School?

Standard 2: The student will identify and describe the impact of local, state, and federal taxes upon income and standard of living.

Resource: It Just Adds Up

Lesson 19 – Income Taxes

Lesson 24 – Taxes Provide Public Goods and Services

Resource: Old MacDonald to Uncle Sam

Lesson 4 – Uncle Sam’s Checkbook.
Students learn about the components of federal income taxes and expenditures. They also create and analyze political cartoons relevant to federal taxes and expenditures.

Resource: Financial Fitness for Life, Bringing Home the Gold, 9-12

Teacher Guide: Theme 2

Lesson 7 – Uncle Sam Takes a Bite
Young people are sometimes surprised to learn that they pay they earn is not the same as the pay they take home. This lesson introduces students to the concepts of gross and net pay. It teaches them how to compute simple deductions, using tax tables, and to determine the take-home pay for two employees

Resource: Financial Fitness for Life, Shaping Up Your Financial Future, 6-8

Teacher Guide: Theme 5

Lesson 17 – What Taxes Affect You?

Standard 3: The student will describe the functions and uses of banks and other financial service providers.

Resource: Learning, Earning, and Investing

Lesson 9 – Banking

Lesson 10 – Banking Services

Lesson 11 – Financial Institutions
The students participate in a brief trading activity to illustrate the role institutions play in bringing savers and borrowers together, thus channeling savings to investment. The students discuss financial institutions, such as banks and credit unions, and they participate in a simulation activity to help them understand primary and secondary stock markets

Resource: Financial Fitness for Life: Bringing Home the Gold, (9-12)

Theme 5,

Lesson 21, Banking Basics
This lesson provides an overview of four types of financial institutions. It invites the students to investigate services available from financial institutions in their own community. As an example of a common financial service, the lesson stresses the basics of using a checking account.

Resource: Focus on Institutions and Markets

Lesson 4 – Financial Systems
Students participate in a brief simulation to demonstrate the important role financial intermediaries play in promoting investment and economic growth in market economies. Through direct instruction, students learn some specialized terms related to financial markets. Then students participate in an activity to help them identify other financial institutions in a market economy.

Resource: From Plan to Market: Teaching Ideas for Social Studies, Economics, and Business Classes

Lesson 7 – Why Middlemen Matter: The Role of Financial Institutions in a Market Economy.
Students participate in a simulation and analyze two case studies emphasizing the importance of the development of financial institutions in the transition economies.

Resource: Your Credit Counts Challenge

Section 2, Financial Institutions
Participants identify the advantages and disadvantages of using financial services from alternative financial institutions and services from mainstream banks. Participants identify the services provided by mainstream financial institutions including banks, credit unions, brokerage firms, and so forth. Participants identify insurance (including homeowner’s, renter’s, health, and auto insurance) as a way to manage risk. Participants analyze scams and identify safeguards against them.

Standard 4: The student will demonstrate the ability to balance a check book and reconcile financial accounts.

Resource: Financial Fitness for Life: Bringing Home the Gold (9-12)

Teacher Guide, Theme 5

Lesson 21 – Banking Basics
This lesson provides an overview of four types of financial institutions. It invites the students to investigate services available from financial institutions in their own community. As an example of a common financial service, the lesson stresses the basics of using a checking account.

The Activity Book which accompanies the Financial Fitness for Life Teacher Guide listed above has activities and illustrations, 21.2 – 21. 3 for Lesson 21.

Resource: Financial Fitness for Life: Shaping Up Your Financial Future (6-8)

Teacher Guide, Theme 5

Lesson 16 – Choosing and Using a Checking Account
Checking accounts offer a menu of features along with a menu of costs. In this lesson, the students learn the fundamentals of maintaining a checking account by examining electronic banking methods, check writing, and entries in a check register. The students examine the features and costs of a checking account to prepare them for the time when they acquire checking accounts of their own.

Standard 5: The student will analyze the costs and benefits of saving and investing.

Resource: It Just Adds Up

Lesson 2 – Plotting Your Future

Lesson 8 – Money: Let’s Trade

Lesson 11 – Borrowers and Lenders

Lesson 12 – Savings

Lesson 13 – Investing

Resource: Capstone Teacher’s Guide

Unit 3

Lesson 16 – Making Choices about Saving and Investing
The circular flow of economic activity is a simplified model of the basic economic relationships in a market economy. This model gives students an overview of how households, businesses, and the government interact in different markets by exchanging goods and services, productive resources (also known as inputs or factors of production), and money.

Resource: Economics and the Environment

Unit 4

Lesson 9 – Weighing the Pluses and the Minuses : Benefit-Cost Analysis
By analyzing a decision that may be very familiar to them — studying versus playing a game — students are introduced to the idea of weighing benefits and costs. The concepts are then applied to a case study of a typical environmental problem: emissions control.

Resource: Financial Fitness for Life, Bringing Home the Gold, (9-12)

Teacher Guide, Theme 3 – Tomorrow’s Money: Getting to the End of the Rainbow

Lesson 8 – What’s the Cost of Spending and Saving?
This lesson examines the benefit and opportunity cost of spending and saving. Students use a chart to learn how compound interest makes savings grow. Compounding provides an incentive to save or invest early. Because of compounding, the benefit of early saving and investing when you are young increases in greater proportion than the opportunity cost.

Lesson 9 – There is No Free Lunch in Investing
Risk is inherent in all investments. In investing, there are risks you cannot control. However, other risks can be controlled. The key is to develop a risk-reward ratio with which you are comfortable. The higher the risk, the greater the potential reward. This is why there is no free lunch in investing. In this lesson, students learn about five types of risk and then compare the risks and rewards of several of the most frequently used investment vehicles. The lesson provides an overview of the investment world.

Lesson 10 – Investment Bingo
Knowledgeable investing involves choosing among many alternatives. A first step is to learn the language of investing and to understand at least some of the basic investment alternatives. Investment Bingo is a vocabulary-building contest involving investment terms. By playing bingo, the students learn the definitions of 24 key investment terms studied in the previous two lessons.

Resources: Financial Fitness for Life, Shaping Up Your Financial Future, (6-8)

Teacher Guide, Theme 3 – Saving

Lesson 6 – Why Save?
In this lesson, the students learn about saving and investing, and they consider the importance of setting short-term, medium-term, and long-term savings goals. They use math skills to solve problems and they play a game called “Rolling For a Goal” to reinforce the concept of goal setting and working towards a goal. Finally, they engage in a family activity that focuses on the opportunity cost of saving.

Lesson 7 – Types of Savings Plans
In this lesson, the students learn about the various types of government insured savings instruments, and the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Lesson 8 – Who Pays and Who Receives?
In this lesson, students learn that banks are businesses and, as such, seek to make a profit. One way banks do this is by charging borrowers a higher rate of interest than the interest that is paid to savers. Students discover that three factors affect how money grows: amount deposited, interest rate, and time. Students calculate interest–both simple and compound–and they formulate a generalization about the difference between simple and compound interest. Finally, they engage in a family activity using the Rule of 72 to estimate how long it takes for money to double.

Lesson 9 – Stocks and Mutual Funds
In this lesson, the student examine the nature of stocks including how stocks are issued, differences in their levels of risk, and the differences in possible returns. The students also compare and contrast stocks with various savings plans provided by financial institutions. The nature of mutual funds, which allows diversification and reduction of risk, will also be covered.

Lesson 10 – Let Lenders and Borrowers Be
Financial intermediaries perform an important function in our economy. Financial institutions accept deposits from those who want both a safe haven for their funds and income from the use of their funds. These institutions also lend funds to people who want to borrow. Investment bankers and stockbrokers perform a similar function in that they bring together those who wish to sell equities with those who wish to invest. The managers of institutions, such as pension funds and mutual funds facilitate the transfer of money and investments. These are called institutional investors. In this lesson, the students learn the functions of financial intermediaries. They will recognize the benefits of successful transfers of funds and the opportunity costs of the decisions associated with the transfer of funds

Lesson 11 – Saving and Investing are Risky Business
In this lesson, the students learn that savings and investment instruments carry various types of risk. Students learn about the risks of inflation, interest rate fluctuation, and financial loss. With any type of investment, there is at least one kind of risk. They also learn that risk must be measured against reward.

Resource: Focus: Middle School Economics

Lesson 15 – Savers and Borrowers
In this lesson, students encounter difficulties in lending and borrowing. They identify financial institutions as effective intermediaries in this process. In closure they discuss the role credit can have on the growth of a community.

Resource: Focus On Economics: Personal Decision Making

Lesson 6 – Financial Planning, Budgeting Your Financial Resources
Students participate in a motivational activity in which they evaluate the costs and benefits of impulse buying and its effect on living on a limited income. After they analyze a sample budget, students develop their own budget that might be appropriate upon leaving school.

Lesson 14 – Savings and Personal Investments: If You’re So Smart, Why Aren’t You Rich?
Students view a transparency showing the difference between economics definitions and personal finance definitions of the terms capital and investment. They read and discuss a handout listing four basic rules for wise investment decisions.

Resource: Focus: High School Economics

Lesson 17 – Saving, Investing, and the Invisible Hand
This lesson explains how financial institutions in a market economy channel savings into economic investments. How much people save and how effectively those savings are transformed into good investments are directly related to a nation’s economic growth. Historically, economic growth has been the primary way market systems reduce poverty and raise standards of living. Economic growth results from several factors, including technological change that stems from research and development on the one hand, and investments in new capital goods that embody those new technologies on the other hand. Economic growth also depends on how successfully individuals and nations invest in education, training, and other forms of human capital, which also requires saving and a reduction in current consumption levels. Most saving and investment decisions in market systems are made by individuals and businesses.

Resource: Focus: Institutions and Market

Lesson 3 – Business Organizations
Students first look at a list of business names and discuss what the various abbreviations that are often used as part of businesses’ names mean. In a reading, students learn about three types of business organizations – sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations. They compare the advantages and disadvantages of each type of business organization, including problems that arise when the objectives of a firm’s owners’ (principals) differ from the objectives of the firm’s managers (agents) and other employees.

Lesson 4 – Financial Systems
Students participate in a brief simulation to demonstrate the important role financial intermediaries play in promoting investment and economic growth in market economies. Through direct instruction, students learn some specialized terms related to financial markets. Then students participate in an activity to help them identify other financial institutions in a market economy.

Resource: Learning, Earning, and Investing

23 lessons on the following themes:

Theme 1 – Basics of Financial Investing

Theme 2 – The Markets

Theme 3 – Financial Planning

Theme 4 – The Markets and the Economy

Resource: Math and Economics

Lesson 11 – Cash or Annuity
This lesson focuses on compound interest, finite geometric series and rates

Lesson 14 – The Mathematics of Savings
Lesson topics include: e or natural logarithms, exponents, percent

Resource: Your Credit Counts Challenge

Teacher’s Guide

Section 5 – Strategies for Building Wealth
Participants will understand the concept of net wealth and how the decisions they make can cause their own net wealth to increase or decrease. Participants will explain why an early start in saving and investing increases a household’s ability to build its wealth. Participants will understand that buying and holding financial assets leads to a greater long-term net wealth than frequent trading of assets. Participants will understand how diversification protects them from changes in the value of any one asset or asset class.

Standard 6: The student will explain and evaluate the importance of planning for retirement.

Resource: Financial Fitness for Life, Bringing Home the Gold, (9-12)

Teacher Guide, Theme 3: Tomorrow’s Money: Getting to the End of the Rainbow

Lesson 8 – What Is the Cost of Spending and Saving?
This lesson examines the benefit and opportunity cost of spending and saving. Students use a chart to learn how compound interest makes savings grow. Compounding provides an incentive to save or invest early. Because of compounding, the benefit of early saving and investing when you are young increases in greater proportion than the opportunity cost.

Lesson 9 – There Is No Free Lunch in Investing
Risk is inherent in all investments. In investing, there are risks you cannot control. However, other risks can be controlled. The key is to develop a risk-reward ratio with which you are comfortable. The higher the risk, the greater the potential reward. This is why there is no free lunch in investing. In this lesson, students learn about five types of risk and then compare the risks and rewards of several of the most frequently used investment vehicles. The lesson provides an overview of the investment world.

Lesson 10 – Investment Bingo
Knowledgeable investing involves choosing among many alternatives. A first step is to learn the language of investing and to understand at least some of the basic investment alternatives. Investment Bingo is a vocabulary-building contest involving investment terms. By playing bingo, the students learn the definitions of 24 key investment terms studied in the previous two lessons.

Resources: Math and Economics: Connections for Life

Lesson 11 – Cash or Annuity

Standard 7: The student will identify the procedures and analyze the responsibilities of borrowing money.

Resource: It Just Adds Up

Lesson 27 – Major Purchases: Buying a Car

Resource: Financial Fitness for Life, Bringing Home the Gold, (9-12)

Teacher Guide, Theme 4: Spending and Credit Are Serious Business

Lesson 11 – What Is Credit?

Lesson 12 – Making Credit Choices

Lesson 13 – Applying for Credit

Lesson 14 – All About Interest

Lesson 15 – Shopping for a Credit Card

Lesson 16 – Shopping for a Mortgage

Lesson 17 – Shopping for an Auto Loan

Resource: Financial Fitness for Life, Shaping Up Your Financial Future, (6-8)

Teacher Guide, Theme 4: Spending and Using Credit

Lesson 12 – Cash or Credit?

Lesson 13 – Establishing Credit

Lesson 14 – Comparison Shopping

Resource: Middle School Economics

Lesson 15 – Savers and Borrowers.
In this lesson, students encounter difficulties in lending and borrowing. They identify financial institutions as effective intermediaries in this process. In closure they discuss the role credit can have on the growth of a community.

Standard 8: The student will describe and explain interest, credit cards, and online commerce.

Resource: It Just Adds Up

Lesson 14 – Consumer Credit

Lesson 15 – Consumer Credit Cards

Lesson 16 – Online Shopping

Lesson 23 – Cellular Phone Service

Resource: Capstone

Unit 3

Lesson 18 – Credit Management
This lesson is designed to help students make good consumer-credit decisions. Although using credit is beneficial at times, it often carries higher costs than many people realize. This lesson discusses the costs of credit in a manner that helps students calculate those costs and integrate them in short- and long-term decisions.

Resource: Financial Fitness for Life, Bringing Home the Gold, (9-12)

Teacher Guide, Theme 4 – Spending and Credit Are Serious Business

Lesson 11 – What Is Credit?
Credit decisions are among the most important choices that young people will make. This lesson provides an overview of what credit is and some of the advantages and disadvantages of using credit. Students examine various types of loans including home mortgages, car loans, college loans, personal loans, and credit card loans.

Lesson 12 – Making Credit Choices
Individuals face many credit choices. Students in this lesson act as financial advisors providing advice on when it may or may not be appropriate to use different forms of credit.

Lesson 13 – Applying for Credit
This lesson explains what a credit report is and how to read one. The students play the role of loan officers and review excerpts from the credit reports of loan applicants. They evaluate each applicant’s credit history and use the information to determine whether to grant the loan request.

Lesson 14 – All About Interest
In order to compare the cost of different loans, students must understand finance charges and interest rates. In this lesson, the students learn how to compute finance charges, how to differentiate between add-on and annual percentage rate and loan repayment period affect the cost of a loan.

Lesson 15 – Shopping for a Credit Card
In 1999, 78 million households in the United States had a credit card, and Americans charged more than one trillion dollars on these cards. Many students believe that all credit cards are created equal. The first part of this lesson emphasizes that credit cards differ from one another in terms of annual fees, annual percentage rates, grace periods, and credit limits. In the second part of the lesson, students learn to read a credit card statement so they can see the real cost of charging goods and services.

Resource: Financial Fitness for Life, Shaping Up Your Financial Future, (6-8)

Teacher Guide, Theme 4 – Spending and Using Credit

Lesson 12 – Cash or Credit?
Most students are aware of the variety of spending options available to consumers. Cash, checks, debit cards, and credit cards are often used by their parents; however, the students probably do not understand the implications of each. This lesson examines the advantages and disadvantages of various payment methods and focuses especially on credit usage. The students are challenged to calculate the cost of credit, compare credit card agreements, and analyze case studies to determine whether credit is being used wisely. In the Family Activity, the students and their families will examine the extent of credit and debt in the United States economy and participate in a game comparing credit card criteria.

Lesson 13 – Establishing Credit
Lenders are in business to grant loans to individuals and businesses. However, the applicant’s ability to repay a loan can mean the difference between profit and loss for the lender. To reduce risk, the lender assesses the applicant’s credit-worthiness by reviewing his or her character, capacity for repayment, and collateral. In this lesson, the students will work through exercises to assess the three “Cs” of several loan applications. They will discover ways they can establish a credit record, and they will learn the rights and responsibilities they have as borrowers.

Lesson 14 – Comparison Shopping
For some people, shopping is an art, and they spend hours and hours making a purchase decision. For others, the goal is to get in, buy it, and get out! Neither of these approaches is necessarily efficient. Making correct consumer choices requires a plan of action–one that neither takes too much of the consumer’s time nor places the consumer in a vulnerable, misinformed position. In this lesson, the students learn a seven-step approach to making a well-informed consumption decision. They also learn to avoid consumer mistakes.

Resource: Great Economics Mysteries Book

Chapter 3

Lesson 2 – The Credit Card Mystery

Resource: Math and Economics: Connections for Life – 9-12

Lesson 15 – The Mathematics of Credit Card Interest and Fixed Payments
It is common for a high school student to receive multiple invitations to enroll for a credit card. In fact, an increasing number of high school students even carry credit cards. One goal of this lesson is to try to uncover some of the mathematics that underlies the calculation of numbers that are found on a monthly credit card statement. While these calculations are done using technology, it will likely help students understand the cost of maintaining balances on a credit card if they are to work out the numbers on their own. The first part of this lesson looks at the computation of the average daily balance on a credit card as well as monthly finance charges. It illustrates how hard it is to pay down a credit card balance when finance charges are carried from month to month and the minimum monthly payment is made. It also illustrates how paying down a credit card balance becomes even more difficult when the card is used to obtain additional credit from one month to the next.

Resource: Personal Decision Making: Focus on Economics

Lesson 10 – Consumer Credit: Buy Now, Pay Later, and More
Through group activity, students analyze the costs and benefits of using credit cards to purchase goods and services.

Resource: Your Credit Counts Challenge

Section 3 – Managing Credit
Participants will identify the advantages and disadvantages of using credit. Participants will recognize what credit is, what it costs, and the basic steps involved in obtaining credit. Participants will identify the key features of a credit report and credit scoring. Participants will examine ways to improve their credit scores. Participants will make distinctions between debit cards and credit cards. Participants will analyze cases of people seeking credit and decide whether obtaining credit is a good idea in each case.

Standard 9: The student will identify and explain consumer fraud and identify theft.

Resource: It Just Adds Up:

Lesson 17 – Protecting Your Identity

Resource: Financial Fitness for Life, Bringing Home the Gold, (9-12)

Teacher Guide

Lesson 18 – Consumer Credit Protection
This lesson provides an overview of consumer credit protection. It stresses the federal laws designed to protect credit consumers from lenders’ mistakes. These include the Truth in Lending Act, Fair Credit Reporting Act, Equal Credit Opportunity Act, Fair Credit Billing Act, Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, and most recently, the Electronic Fund Transfer Act.

Lesson 19 – Scams and Schemes
This lesson reminds students that while most credit transactions are completely legal, there are some that are not. This lesson introduces scams and schemes, such as identity theft, loan scams, and credit repair loans. The lesson also features legal but high-cost credit practices prevalent in urban areas such as payday loans and rent-to-own plans.

Standard 10: The student will explain and compare the responsibilities of renting versus buying a home.

Resource: Financial Fitness for Life, Bringing Home the Gold, (9-12)

Teacher Guide

Lesson 16 – Shopping for a Mortgage
In this lesson, students use a computer loan calculator to determine the cost of a loan. This technique is particularly important for mortgage calculations. There are many loan calculators on the Internet, and many software packages, such as Quicken, also contain loan calculators.

Resource: Focus on Personal Decision Making

Lesson 11 – Housing: Deciding to Rent or Buy.
Students begin by learning to apply the decision-making process to a major purchasing decision, and they become acquainted with how to use a decision making grid. Next, students will participate in a simulation in which they are buyers and sellers of housing services. Some students will be buyers who must decide whether to rent or buy. Other students will be sellers who have houses or apartments to offer. Students must go to the marketplace to make their purchases.

Resource: Your Credit Count Challenge:

Section 4 – A Roof Over Your Head.
Participants will understand the benefits and drawbacks of homeownership. Participants will understand the process of buying a home, from before house-hunting to closing and occupancy. Participants will understand the risks of speculating with money being saved toward a down payment and the risks presented by refinancing with predatory lenders.

Standard 11: The students will describe and explain how various types of insurance can be used to manage risk.

Resource: It Just Adds Up

Lesson 18 – Insurance: Managing Your Risk

Resource: Virtual Economics Insurance Lessons

Lesson 1 – Why Insurance and How Does It Work?

Lesson 2 – The Basics of Life Insurance

Lesson 3 – Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Automobile Insurance

Lesson 4 – Why Renter’s Insurance?

Resource: Financial Fitness for Life, Bringing Home the Gold (9-12)

Teacher Guide, Theme 5

Lesson 22 – Managing Risk: The Good News about Insurance.
As people begin to acquire assets and an income, they begin to think about how to protect what they have from loss. Toward this end, many people buy insurance. This lesson tells how insurance works and provides an overview of the different types of insurance. Students participate in a simulation that allows them to practice their understanding of the costs and benefits associated with purchasing insurance.

Standard 12: The student will explain and evaluate the financial impact and consequences of gambling.

Standard 13: The student will evaluate the consequences of bankruptcy.

Standard 14: The student will explain the costs and benefits of charitable giving.

Resource: It Just Adds Up

Lesson 14 – Charitable Contributions: Giving to Others

Resources Available from the National Council on Economic Education on the Virtual Economics CD

Capstone: Exemplary Lessons for High School Economics
Teacher’s Guide and Student Activities, 2003

Choices and Changes in Life, School And Work, 2002
Economics and the Environment, 1996

Entrepreneurship and the US Economy, 1994

Financial Fitness for Life: Bringing Home the Gold
Teacher Guide and Student Activity Book, Grades 9-12, 2001

Financial Fitness for Life: Shaping Up Your Financial Future
Teacher Guide and Student Activity Book, Grades 6-8. 2001

Financial Fitness for Life: Talking to Your Kids about Personal Finance
An Activity-Based Guide for Parents, 2001

Focus on Economics: Personal Decision Making, 1998

Focus on Institutions and Markets, 2003

Focus: High School Economics, 2003

Focus: Middle School Economics, 1996

From Plan to Market: Teaching Ideas for Social Studies, Economics, and Business Classes, 2000

Learning, Earning, and Investing, 2004

Master Curriculum Guide: Economics and Entrepreneurship

Mathematics and Economics, Connections for Life, 2001

Old MacDonald to Uncle Sam, 2002

Personal Decision Making, 1996

The Great Economics Mysteries Book: A Guide to Teaching Economic Reasoning, 2000

Your Credit Counts Challenge, Virtual Economics

For more information and teacher resources, please visit moneyisok.org